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Get your hospitality career cooking!!
Is Tourism your game? Take the plunge!

Get your hospitality career cooking!!

Your next team member awaits...
CAREERS

What I've learnt: Thomas Pash

The CEO of the fast-growing Urban Purveyor Group talks about the importance of deep knowledge, and what the real secret sauce in the hospitality business is.


“I’ve loved the industry from the moment I got into it. My first hospitality job was when I was 14 at a ten-table Mexican restaurant. I was the cook, the server, and the janitor: you name it I did it. I was fortunate enough between starting out very young and being the CEO of a two-billion-dollar hospitality group by the age of 30 to touch on just about every position across the industry: from bartender to catering service manager.

I’ve worked with some pretty amazing groups from the beginning and was lucky they thought I was doing a good enough job to promote me at a relatively young age. By the time I was 18 I was the general manager of a large seafood restaurant that, in the early ’90s, was turning over $125,000 per week. At 22 I was managing my first 2000-room hotel.

No matter where people end up working, I think that everybody should spend time in the service and hospitality industry. It helps you to learn, identify and relate to human behaviour. It’s also gives you experience of handling stress in a fast-paced environment.

Over the years I’ve worked with some companies that were very good at what they do. Generally they had a very specific sequence of service and focused on taking care of the customer. One of the secrets I’ve learned is the importance of having a deep knowledge of your product, whether that’s menu items or catering options. Early on, some of the more rigorous training programs I went through encouraged a maniacal attention to a detailed product understanding. That’s stuck with me. Knowledge gives you credibility when you are talking to and taking care of a guest. It allows you and the rest of your team to take real pride in what you offer.

In many ways this industry is very simple; you need to control the various “cogs”. The rent “cog” is central and should be between five and eight percent of your sales. If you control your rent, labour, food and beverage “cogs” you can do very well out of it. If you lose site of one category or another, it’s typically an uphill battle.

Many people, when opening a new restaurant or bar, tend to limit themselves, thinking a small venue is easier to manage. Starting out small can really hurt you long term. Within the Urban Purveyor Group, a lot of our venues seem really big. Possibly too big from Monday to Wednesday, but it’s those peak days from Thursday to Sunday that make the business. That’s when the bulk of people are dining out and spending their money and that can really push the needle on making a profit. You don’t want to be turning people away on a Friday night because you’re constrained by size and number of seats at peak times. If you want to get big or maximise your opportunities in this industry it’s okay to think big and it’s okay to over-design or over-scale a venue because you really can benefit from that.

After going through business school and being a part of some wonderful companies, I’ve realised that all great companies are really service-based companies. Having a service-based approach will work for any business even if you are not in a service industry. People who grew up in hospitality understand service: they are not just looking after their guests; they’re serving each other.

A great thing about this industry: the feedback is immediate.  If you ask for feedback from your customers you will get it. Whether it’s good or bad you can immediately implement a change or improvement. I’m a student of the industry; I study the competition. I look at who are doing things that are interesting. You can take ideas and incorporate them into your business the next day and get immediate feedback from your customers. See what the innovators are doing out there, then grab it and bring it back to your restaurant or bar. Go out and see what’s driving the customer, work out who is doing what is expected but also that little bit more. It’s that little more that really is the secret sauce of the industry.”

http://rca.asn.au/magazine/what-ive-learnt-thomas-pash/

Canberra Institute of Technology
CAREERS

HTN Apprentice of the month - Tara Mulligan

Tara Mulligan is HTN's apprentice of the month and is currently working at Twin Creeks Country Club

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CAREERS

Meet QTIC's intern Shanshan Fan

As an international student from China, my name is Shanshan Fan and it is my last semester of a Master Degree of Tourism, Hospitality and Event Management at The University of Queensland.

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Safe Work Australia
CAREERS

Recipe for success: Brien Trippas

Growing up in the British Midlands, Brien Trippas felt no particular passion for food. But when his father booked him into the Birmingham College of Food, Tourism and Creative Studies, he knew he had found his calling.

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CAREERS

Sydney's ICC wins national infrastructure award





Sydney’s International Convention Centre (ICC Sydney) at Darling Harbour has been named Australia’s best infrastructure project at the Infrastructure Partnerships Australia’s National Infrastructure Awards.

Andrew Constance Minister for Transport and Infrastructure welcomed the award saying the ICC was a jewel in the NSW Government’s infrastructure crown.

“I am extremely proud that this Government has delivered a world class transformation to the Darling Harbour precinct with the stunning International Convention Centre at its heart,” Mr Constance said.

ICC Sydney cements Sydney as a premium choice on the world stage for major events that this nation has never before had the facilities to host.

“The NSW Government remains focused on the delivery of infrastructure that transforms our state and has a positive impact on our economy. The ICC certainly delivers on this.”

The $1.5 billion ICC Sydney was recognised for its design excellence, construction timeline and outstanding financial performance as well as delivering the nation a new and emblematic piece of business events and tourism infrastructure.

The convention centre officially opened in December 2016 and has already hosted over 170 major events including the Fast 4 Tennis Showdown and performances by Keith Urban and Nick Cave. The convention centre is also generating significant international interest with 115 global events confirmed for Sydney over the next few years.

To get a job and or start your career with ICC Sydney,  CLICK HERE



CAREERS

10 week pre-apprenticeship program to kick start your career as a chef...

Have you thought about a career in hospitality? Maybe you've always dreamed of being a chef, but you are unsure about how to do it? Do you want to give it a try?

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Stanley College
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TAFE QLD tourism, travel and hospitality

Get the edge you need to quickly progress through the ranks in the tourism and hospitality industry.

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Hospitality Careers at Careers Australia

Australia's tourism and hospitality is a major contributor to the economy and is forecast to continue to grow. Now's the time to start your career in hospitality!

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CAREERS

10 week Commercial Cookery pre-apprenticeship in Sydney - apply now!

In May Restaurant & Catering will be running a 10 week Commercial Cookery pre-apprenticeship in Sydney.

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